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Finals Complete at 2015 National Selection Regatta 2

by Ed Moran, ed@usrowing.org | May 14, 2015
The first stroke of Gevvie Stone’s finals race in the women’s single sculls did not go as she had imagined. “It was just a really bad stroke,” said the 2012 Olympian and two-time national team sculler. Stone (Newton, Mass.) didn’t waste a lot of time regaining her composure and before very long, was leading the way in the her event on Thursday at National Selection Regatta 2 on Mercer Lake in West Windsor, N.J.

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NSR2 W1xWEST WINDSOR, N.J. – The first stroke of Gevvie Stone’s finals race in the women’s single sculls did not go as she had imagined.

“It was just a really bad stroke,” said the 2012 Olympian and two-time national team sculler. Stone (Newton, Mass.) didn’t waste a lot of time regaining her composure and before very long, was leading the way in the her event on Thursday at National Selection Regatta 2 on Mercer Lake in West Windsor, N.J.

After claiming a commanding lead, Stone comfortably rowed the rest of the 2,000 meters and won in 7:45.02. USRowing Training Center – Princeton’s Emily Huelskamp (Sainte Genevieve, Mo.) was second in 7:53.41 and Craftsbury’s Elizabeth Sonshine (Craftsbury, Vt.) was third in 8:05.07.

“It was fun,” said Stone, who won the event last year to earn her spot on the 2014 national team at the second world cup in Aiguebelette, France, then went on to finish ninth at the 2014 World Rowing Championships. “Emily put together a good fight, and I really had to execute my best piece. And I did. 

Like all the winners in the four featured events at NSR 2, which also included the men’s single, lightweight men’s double sculls and men’s quadruple sculls, Stone will have the opportunity to race at one of the remaining world cup races and potentially earn a place on the 2015 U.S. National Team with a top-seven finish.

NSR2 M1xThe first race of the morning was the final of the men’s single sculls. Off the line, Community Rowing Inc.’s Lucas Wilhelm (Miranda, Calif.) took an early lead, but Craftsbury Sculling Center’s William Cowles (Farmington, Conn.) reeled him in and pushed through the second half of the course to drive into an open-water lead.

 Cowles won in 7:11.81. Leonard Futterman (New York, N.Y.) of the Potomac Boat Club was second in 7:21.27, and Wilhelm was third in 7:21.60.

“(Wilhelm) had a good start,” said Cowles. “At this point, I know where my strengths lie, and that’s from five hundred to five hundred and just taking inches. I was able to get out to a pretty good lead by the end.”

NSR2 M4xIn the men’s quadruple sculls event, two crews, California Rowing Club’s Hans Struzyna (Seattle, Wash.), John Madura (West Milford, N.J.), Ryan Shelton (Wrightwood, Calif.) and Paul Marcy (Guilford, Vermont) and Craftsbury Sculling Center’s Benjamin Dann (Pound Ridge, N.J.), John Graves (Cincinnati, Ohio), London Olympian Peter Graves (Cincinnati, Ohio) andThomas Graves (Cincinnati, Ohio) went head-to-head, exchanging leads the length of the course.

 

Coming into the last quarter, CRC pulled ahead and crossed in first in 5:57.84. Craftsbury was second in 6:01.73.

 

“That was a pretty good piece,” said Marcy. “We had a solid warm up and a solid row, and we executed our race plan like we wanted. I had my head in the boat, and I didn’t really see until after the thousand meters that we were a half-length up.”

 

NSR2 LM2xThe lightweight men’s double sculls final saw three crews go to the line including Cambridge Boat Club’s Joshua Konieczny (Millbury, Ohio) and Andrew Campbell, Jr. (New Canaan, Conn.), the composite Cambridge and Malta Boat Club entry of Austin Meyer (Cohoes, N.Y.) and Colin Ethridge (Laytonsville, Md.) and a composite entry from Megunticook Rowing and Craftsbury Sculling Center in Matt O’Leary (Westwood, Mass.) and Hugh McAdam (Grantham, N.H.).

 

Cambridge took an early lead, and at the halfway point was in a significant open-water lead and crossed first in 6:29.13. Meyer and Ethridge were second in 6:46.09, and O’Leary and McAdam finished third in 6:46.57.

 

“This particular race just felt very consistent all the way through, so we didn’t do anything too crazy. We were able to maintain speed all the way down the course, which I think for us is a huge positive, that there is no sort of lull,” said Konieczny. “Overall, we’re very pleased with the result.”

 

Campbell, who has rowed in the lightweight men’s single for the majority of his career on the national team, with the exception of a portion of 2012 when he tried to make the London Olympic squad in the lightweight double, said this was, “step two of five towards making the Olympic team. With everything in rowing, we take things one step at a time and we are incredibly pleased to have moved closer to our eventual goal.”

 

About USRowing

USRowing is a nonprofit organization recognized by the United States Olympic Committee as the governing body for the sport of rowing in the United States. USRowing has 75,000 individual members and 1,300 member organizations, offering rowing programs for all. USRowing receives generous support from the National Rowing Foundation and its corporate sponsors and partners: ANXeBusiness Corp, Boathouse Sports, Bucket List Events, Connect-A-Dock, EMCVenues, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Rudy Project and Shimano. USRowing’s official suppliers include Concept 2, Croker Oars, JanSport, Nielsen Kellerman, Vespoli and WinTech.  USRowing relies on strong partnerships to enable continued success. America Rows, which supports diversity in rowing and provides opportunities for those with disabilities, also benefits from corporate support.

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