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One Woman’s Olympic Journey: Course Correction in Paperback and Audio Coming April 12

by Ed Moran, ed@usrowing.org | Apr 01, 2016
PRINCETON, N.J. – More than four decades after she first picked up a rowing oar, 1984 Olympic silver medalist and Row to Rio legend Ginny Gilder is still waking waves. Her book, Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX, is scheduled to release in paperback and audio this month.
GILDER-CourseCorrectionPRINCETON, N.J. – More than four decades after she first picked up a rowing oar, 1984 Olympic silver medalist and Row to Rio legend Ginny Gilder is still making waves. Her book, Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX, is scheduled to release in paperback and audio this month.

The audiobook, narrated by Grammy Award Winner, Janis Ian, will go on sale April 12, 2016.

A long-time supporter of rowing, Gilder is proud to assist aspiring Olympians on their journey to the 2016 Olympic Games and will donate 20 percent of proceeds from her book sales to the U.S. National team.

In Course Correction, which Kirkus Reviews hails as a "passionate memoir,” and Booklist calls "intimate and detailed,” Gilder explores these questions and the many others she faced during her ten year quest to reach the top echelon of her sport, culminating in her silver medal win at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

Gilder, the founder and CEO of an investment business and the co-owner of the WNBA’s Seattle Storm, charts her journey from her privileged yet troubled upbringing in Manhattan to her years at Yale and beyond, when she pushed her body to its limit while fighting debilitating asthma, gender discrimination, and a host of other obstacles. Having come of age during the 1970s, Gilder also examines the broader social context in which her story unfolds, including the rise of the women's movement and the effects of Title IX, and the struggle to accept one's sexuality at a time when coming out had profound costs.

Gilder remembers falling in love with rowing as a freshman at Yale, just a few years after the passage of Title IX, when men's programs were still better funded and their facilities far superior to women's. She details the training she went through as she moved from novice athlete to seasoned competitor, all while she and her teammates contended with hostility from male rowers and unequal access to everything from the weight room to the rowing tanks. Because there were no women's showers at the boathouse, she recalls, the women had to sit on the bus, cold and wet, waiting for the men to finish their showers, before they could make the half hour trip back to campus.

The women's anger with this situation finally reached a boiling point, she writes, resulting in the famous Title IX naked protest when she and other team members, "Title IX" scrawled across their backs, stripped naked in front of a Yale administrator. After news outlets across the country covered the protest, Yale made plans to accommodate the women the following year.

"I felt the magnificence of the moment: standing up for myself, for all of us, surrounded and strengthened by my compatriots," remembers Gilder. "I could stand tall and strong without stooping to accommodate the prejudice or preferences of others, buoyed and bolstered by my teammates."

While succumbing to rowing's "demanding embrace," Gilder was suffering from the earlier collapse of what she had assumed would be her "happily-ever-after-family." She shares the story of going from an idyllic childhood, living with her parents and three siblings in a Park Avenue penthouse with summers in East Hampton, to her wrenching pre-adolescent years when her mother suffered a mental breakdown, including an attempted suicide, after Gilder’s father abandoned the family.

"I grew up among experts in deception who lived one way behind closed doors and another in open spaces," writes Gilder. "I knew how to buck up and shut up. I knew all about swallowing hard and putting on my game face. I knew how to swim the oceanic emptiness between private terror and public confidence."

In the years following the height of her rowing career, Gilder weathered far worse emotional turmoil on the way to eventually finding herself. She recalls the deep well of grief and depression she lived through after giving birth to a stillborn baby, the joy of later being graced with motherhood, and how, after falling in love with Lynn, now her wife, she found the strength to finally accept her sexuality and leave her first marriage.

"I set myself on a course to learn how to be tough, how to protect myself" she muses. "Rowing taught me toughness, but it turns out I had much more to learn to row my own race."

About the Book
Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX
By Ginny Gilder
Audiobook narrated by Grammy Award Winner, Janis Ian
Paperback/Audio on-sale date: April 12, 2016
ISBN: 9780807090367; $20.00

Contact: Lucinda Blumenfeld, 212-605-0348, lucinda@lucindaliterary.com.


To Purchase the Book:
"Add to Cart"
Use Promo Code: ROWTORIO to receive 10% off
 
A long-time supporter of rowing, 1984 Olympic silver medalist and Row to Rio legend, Ginny Gilder is proud to support aspiring Olympians on their journey to the 2016 Games. Ginny will donate 20% of proceeds from her book sales to the U.S. National Team.


About USRowing
USRowing is a nonprofit organization recognized by the United States Olympic Committee as the governing body for the sport of rowing in the United States. USRowing has 85,000 individual members and 1,300 member organizations, offering rowing programs for all. USRowing receives generous support from the National Rowing Foundation and its corporate sponsors and partners.

For more information, contact: USRowing Communications, (609) 751-0710, media@usrowing.org..
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